Advertisement

Content of the Duty of Confidentiality

  • Elza Reymond-Eniaeva
Chapter
Part of the European Yearbook of International Economic Law book series (EUROYEAR, volume 7)

Abstract

Defining the content of the duty of confidentiality is no easy task. There is so much that can be included in the content of the duty of confidentiality. Some examples are: the mere existence of the arbitration, the nature of the dispute, the amount in dispute, the status of the case, the names of the parties, the names of counsel, the names of arbitrators, parties’ submissions, fact exhibits, documents produced in response to a request for production of documents, witness statements, expert reports, pleadings, transcripts of hearings, tribunal’s deliberations, the award itself, any details revealing the content of the award, etc.

Bibliography

  1. Berger B, Kellerhals F (2015) International and domestic arbitration in Switzerland, 3rd edn. Staempfli, BernGoogle Scholar
  2. Blackaby N, Partasides C et al (2015) Redfern and hunter on international arbitration, 6th edn. Oxford University PressGoogle Scholar
  3. Born GB (2014) International commercial arbitration, 2nd edn. Walters KluwerGoogle Scholar
  4. Brocker S, Löf K (2013) Chapter 8, the proceedings. In: Franke U, Magnusson A et al (eds) International arbitration in Sweden: a practitioner’s guide. Kluwer Law International, pp 153–236Google Scholar
  5. Brown AC (2001) Presumption meets reality: an exploration of the confidentiality obligation in international commercial arbitration. Am Univ Int Law Rev 16(4):969–1025Google Scholar
  6. Buys CJ (2003) The tensions between confidentiality and transparency in international arbitration. Am Rev Int Arbitr 14:121–138Google Scholar
  7. Coppo B (2013) Confidentiality in the arbitration rules of the Milan Chamber. In: Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/the case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards. Juris, New York, pp 137–153Google Scholar
  8. Fernandez-Armesto J (2012) The time has come/A plea for abandoning secrecy in arbitration. Les Cahiers de l’Arbitrage, No. 3Google Scholar
  9. Furrer A (2008) The duty of confidentiality in international arbitration. In: Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre Tercier. GenèveGoogle Scholar
  10. Gu W (2004) Confidentiality revisited: blessing or curse in international commercial arbitration. Am Rev Int Arbitr 15:607Google Scholar
  11. Heuman L (2003) Arbitration law of Sweden: practice and procedure. Juris, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  12. Hollander P (2014) Confidentiality under Art. 44 Swiss rules. In: Voser N (ed) 10 Year of Swiss rules of international arbitration. ASA Special Series No. 44. JurisGoogle Scholar
  13. Karton J (2012) A conflict of interests: seeking a way forward on publication of international arbitral awards. Arbitr Int 28(3):447–486CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kaufmann-Kohler G (2007) Arbitral precedent: dream, necessity or excuse. Arbitr Int 23(3):357–378CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kawharu A (2008) New Zealand’s arbitration law receives a tune-up. Arbitr Int 24(3):405–422CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Lew JDM (1982) The case for the publication of arbitration awards. In: The art of arbitration/ Essays on international arbitration/ Liber Amicorum Pieter Sanders 12 September 1912–1982. Kluwer, p 223Google Scholar
  17. Lew JDM (2011) The arbitrator and confidentiality. In: Dossier of the ICC Institute of world business law: is arbitration only as good as the arbitrator? Status, powers and role of the arbitratorGoogle Scholar
  18. Madsen F (2007) Commercial arbitration in Sweden, 3rd edn. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  19. Malatesta A (2013) Confidentiality in international commercial arbitration. In: Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/ The case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards. Juris, New York, pp 39–51Google Scholar
  20. Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) (2013) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/ The case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards. Juris, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  21. Mcllwrath M, Schroeder R (2013) Users need more transparency in international arbitration. In: Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/ The case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards. Juris, New York, pp 87–106Google Scholar
  22. Mourre A (2013) The case for the publication of arbitral awards. In: Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/ The case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards. Juris, New York, pp 53–72Google Scholar
  23. Müller C (2005) La confidentialité en arbitrage commercial international: un trompe-l’oeil. ASA Bull 23(2):216–240Google Scholar
  24. Nesbitt S, Darowski M (2015) LCIA arbitration rules, Article 30. In: Mistelis LA (ed) Concise international arbitration, 2nd edn. Kluwer Law International, pp 558–560Google Scholar
  25. Perret F (2007) Is there a need for consistency in international commercial arbitration? In: Banifatemi Y (ed) Precedent in international arbitration. International Arbitration Institute Seminar, ParisGoogle Scholar
  26. Poudret JF, Besson S (2007) Comparative law of international arbitration, 2nd edn. Sweet & Maxwell, LondonGoogle Scholar
  27. Rohner T, La Spada F (2013) Commentary of Article 44 of the Swiss rules of international arbitration. In: Zuberbühler T, Müller C, Habegger P (eds) Swiss rules of international arbitration, commentary, 2nd edn. Zurich-Basel-GenevaGoogle Scholar
  28. Sali R (2013) Transparency and confidentiality: how and why to publish arbitration decisions. In: Malatesta A, Sali R (eds) The rise of transparency in international arbitration/ the case for the anonymous publication of arbitral awards, New York, pp 73–85Google Scholar
  29. Shaughnessy P (2006) The Swedish approach towards arbitration. In: Heuman L, Jarvin S (eds) The Swedish arbitration act of 1999, five years on: a critical review of strengths and weaknesses. Juris, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elza Reymond-Eniaeva
    • 1
  1. 1.LausanneSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations