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Pathology of Primary Nonlymphoid and Non-mesenchymal Skin Cancer

  • Konstantina Frangia-TsivouEmail author
  • Martin C. MihmJr
Chapter
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Abstract

Skin cancer represents the most common type of human cancer and encompasses a great number of malignant neoplasms deriving from different cells of the human skin [1]. The most common tumors arise from epithelial cells of the epidermis and the adnexa. There are also tumors of neuroendocrine cells (Merkel cell carcinoma) [2] or of melanocytes, namely, melanoma [3]. The other tumors derive from the lymphohematopoietic system [3] and the mesenchyme.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.HistoBio Diagnosis S.A. Pathology LaboratoryAthensGreece
  2. 2.Department of DermatologyBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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