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67-Year-Old with Thick Plaques on the Palms

  • Kevin K. Wu
  • Michael P. Lee
  • Jashin J. Wu
Chapter
Part of the Clinical Cases in Dermatology book series (CLIDADE)

Abstract

Palmar-plantar psoriasis presents with erythematous, thick, scaly plaques on the palms and soles, which cause significant physical distress and occupational disability to patients affected. Mild cases of palmar-plantar psoriasis may be treated with high-potency topical corticosteroids. Severe cases may be treated with systemic therapies such as retinoids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, apremilast, ustekinumab, secukinumab, and ixekizumab. TNF inhibitors may paradoxically induce palmar-plantar psoriasis and should be avoided.

Keywords

Palmar-plantar psoriasis Physical burden Disability Topical corticosteroid Retinoids Methotrexate Cyclosporine Apremilast Ustekinumab Secukinumab Ixekizumab 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin K. Wu
    • 1
  • Michael P. Lee
    • 2
  • Jashin J. Wu
    • 3
  1. 1.Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac UniversityNorth HavenUSA
  2. 2.Eastern Virginia Medical SchoolNorfolkUSA
  3. 3.Founder and CEODermatology Research and Education FoundationIrvineUSA

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