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Bovine Tuberculosis in Zambia

  • Sydney MalamaEmail author
  • Musso Munyeme
  • John B. Muma
Chapter

Abstract

Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is one of the major infectious diseases of cattle and Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) in Zambia. Other wildlife species are probably infected, and the disease has also been diagnosed in humans. In cattle, high prevalence rates have been detected and the disease occurs particularly in the Southern, Western, and Eastern Provinces. On the Kafue flats especially during the dry season, humans and animals (both livestock and wildlife) share the same microenvironments such as at grazing and water points. This close association increases the risk of the transmission of Mycobacterium bovis from infected to susceptible hosts including humans, and similar spoligotypes of M. bovis circulate in cattle, humans, and Kafue lechwe. Although BTB is a notifiable disease in Zambia, and in spite of its significant impact on livestock production and confirmed zoonotic transmission to humans, it is not actively controlled. A control strategy to be funded by the World Bank is currently being developed.

Keywords

Zambia Bovine tuberculosis Mycobacterium bovis TB zoonosis Molecular epidemiology Kafue lechwe 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biological Sciences Department, School of Natural SciencesUniversity of ZambiaLusakaZambia
  2. 2.Department of Disease Control, School of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZambiaLusakaZambia

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