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The Political Priest: Multiple Stances, Multiple Selves

  • Jay M. Woodhams
Chapter

Abstract

Identities can be multiple, in conflict, or incongruous, and individuals play a complex game managing them in interaction. This chapter explores the case of a discussion with Steven, where the intersections and tensions between his political and religious identities provide a window onto stance multiplicity. There are always tensions within identity genesis; Steven’s case shows how these can be managed when becoming a political person in discourse.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay M. Woodhams
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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