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The Politics of Democratic Collective Action

  • Roberto Frega
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the pragmatist group-based theory of politics. It begins by reconstructing some tenets of the political debates of the age, and proceeds to discuss Arthur Bentley’s interest-based theory of democracy, Mary Parker Follett pluralist theory of democratic group formation, and John Dewey’s theory of publics. It then introduces and discusses some basic categories of the pragmatist group-based theory of politics, such as those of consequences, public, institutions, and problem solving. Like in the previous chapter, the contribution of these authors to the genesis of the ideas presented in the chapter is acknowledged and shown.

Keywords

Pragmatism John Dewey Mary Parker Follett Arthur Bentley Public Democratic theory 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Frega
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre Marc BlochBerlinGermany

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