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The Pragmatist Social Account of Democracy

  • Roberto Frega
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is one of the two more historically oriented chapters of the book. It examines the social and political theories of a series of American thinkers loosely connected with the pragmatist tradition: besides John Dewey, the works of George H. Mead, Charles H. Cooley, and Mary Parker Follett are examined with the aim of developing a social theory of democracy. Three main aspects are highlighted: the idea of democracy as method, the priority of involvement in joint action over autonomy, and the social-ontological structuration of democracy. The contribution of these authors to the genesis of this idea is acknowledged and shown.

Keywords

Social democracy Pragmatism John Dewey Charles Cooley Mary Parker Follett 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Frega
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre Marc BlochBerlinGermany

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