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The Grey Figure of Crime: If It Isn’t Crimed, It Hasn’t Happened

  • Rachael AplinEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Aplin highlights that “cuffing” crimes is an enduring discretionary police practice. Sixty-nine per cent of HBA cases (and 89% of incidents over three years) are not recorded as crimes, despite evidence of criminal offences. In justifying no-crime decisions, officers rely on perceived legalities and formal rules, such as the NCRS requirement for “victim confirmation” of crimes, as well as bias and subjective judgement. Performance target pressures and pre-empting CPS no-charge decisions are also explored. Overwhelmingly, findings illustrate that victim reluctance adversely impacts officer’s no-crime decisions. Manufacturing victim reluctance is effective in validating police inaction and in officers circumventing perceived “wasted workload.” If it is not crimed, it has technically “not happened,” which abrogates officers of responsibilities around investigation, prosecution and safeguarding.

Keywords

Policing honour-based abuse Crime recording Threats to kill Performance targets Manufactured victim reluctance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK

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