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Introduction

  • Rachael AplinEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Honour-based abuse (HBA) is introduced as a gendered crime with the control of female sexuality as central. As the study hinges on police discretionary practices, organisational culture(s), socialisation, discretion and storytelling are explored. Whether a monolithic police culture exists is compared against more fluid interpretations of police culture(s).

The challenges of policing HBA are outlined. Cultural aspects distinguish HBA from other “domestics,” presenting additional barriers that impede victims from reporting and prosecuting the abuse. Notably, this is a Muslim-on-Muslim crime; minorities fear racist attitudes from professionals; female perpetration and multiple perpetration feature; honour codes exacerbate difficulties for victims; and perpetrators are ascribed a heroic status. Despite cultural nuances, HBA shares resounding similarities with other forms of violence and should remain within the domestic abuse framework.

Keywords

Honour and shame Culture Policing Organisational culture(s) Discretion Domestic abuse 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK

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