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The Assessment and Acquisition of Water Resources for Shale Gas Development in the UK

  • Jenna BrownEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Water Security in a New World book series (WSEC)

Abstract

Shale gas is conjectured to potentially improve the UK’s security of natural gas supply’s status by substituting up to half of natural imports by 2035. This paper explores the subsequent demands upon freshwater resources, the process of resource acquisition by operators and the prerequisite procedural of assessment. This is followed by a water management case study of Cuadrilla Resources, the leading shale gas operator in the UK before concluding comments.

Keywords

United Kingdom Shale gas Water acquisition Planning application 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of the West of EnglandBristolUK

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