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Regulating the Disposal of Produced Waters from Unconventional Oil and Gas Activities in Australia

  • Tina Soliman HunterEmail author
  • David Campin
Chapter
Part of the Water Security in a New World book series (WSEC)

Abstract

Production of unconventional petroleum resources in Australia comprises the exploration for and extraction of shale gas and coal seam gas (CSG, also known as coalbed methane). This chapter examines the issues associated with produced water from CSG and shale gas extraction, which differ greatly in both content and regulation. In examining the regulation of produced water from the extraction of CSG, only the Queensland jurisdiction will be assessed, since it is the only jurisdiction where production is occurring. Due to a moratorium on shale gas exploration and extraction in the Northern Territory, the regulation of produced water from shale gas exploration and production in Western Australia and South Australia is considered, with a particular focus on Western Australia given the advanced development of shale gas exploration in that state. This chapter provides an overview of unconventional petroleum resources (UPR) in Australia, and the regulation of UPR exploration and production in Queensland, Western Australia, and South Australia. It considers issues relating to produced water from both shale gas and CSG production and analyses the legal and environmental issues related to produced water in shale gas and CSG activities.

Keywords

Australia Unconventional petroleum resources Coal seam gas Dewatering Shale gas 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Energy LawUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenUK
  2. 2.The University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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