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Conclusions

  • Fausto Martin De Sanctis
Chapter

Abstract

Although a facilitator tool to day-to-day life, the Internet has turned out an intriguing and complex tool. Also it became a way to the maintenance of people’s anonymity making difficulty to curb international crimes. The author provides a reflection on the cyberspace and the need for a well-designed international regulatory environment.

Keywords

Conclusions Internet challenges Need for improvements 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fausto Martin De Sanctis
    • 1
  1. 1.3rd RegionFederal Court of AppealsSão PauloBrazil

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