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Love and Affirmation of the World: Inaugural Max Charlesworth Memorial Lecture, Deakin University, Melbourne, 2015

  • Morny JoyEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 30)

Abstract

This paper explores the philosophical writings of Hannah Arendt and Paul Ricoeur. Both scholars are linked with Continental philosophy, where Ricoeur is respected for his work on Edmund Husserl and phenomenology – areas that were formative for Professor Charlesworth. Ricoeur, Arendt and Charlesworth all shared a strong commitment to contemporary issues that integrated activism with philosophical reflection. Both of these scholars were committed to affirming life in this world. Arendt and Ricoeur did not always agree, but their respective philosophical contributions were devoted to trying to alleviate what they considered to be injustice. They were both deeply concerned by the suffering that human beings continued to inflict on their fellow creatures. This study presents both a comparison and contrast of their insights and their efforts to help humankind flourish. I dedicate this essay to Professor Max Charlesworth as a scholar who is equally as resolute as both Paul Ricoeur and Hannah Arendt in combining a wide-ranging, inclusive social vision and a passion for justice.

Keywords

Hannah Arendt Paul Ricoeur Phenomenology Natality Narrative self Thinking Imagination Political action 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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