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Use of Uptake Values to Estimate the Effective Dose to Patients in Positron Emission Tomography

  • Adnan BeganovićEmail author
  • Rahima Jašić
  • Maja Gazdić-Šantić
  • Amra Skopljak-Beganović
  • Nermina Bešlić
  • Šejla Cerić
  • Amera Šadija
  • Sandra Vegar-Zubović
Conference paper
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 73)

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic imaging modality in nuclear medicine. The most common radionuclide in PET is 18F fluoro deoxyglucose (FDG). In this study we used the information on radionuclide uptake from PET images and software to make an estimation of effective dose received by patients during 18F-FDG PET examination. We analysed data from 50 patients who performed positron emission tomography—computed tomography (PET-CT) examination. Uptake values were collected in bladder, bones, heart wall, kidneys, liver, brain and remainder. Using a simplified biokinetic model, residence time was calculated and used as an input parameter in OLINDA/EXM® software package. The conversion factor from administered activity to effective dose was found to be \( 0.016\frac{{{\text{mSv}}}}{{{\text{MBq}}}} \), which is only 15% less then value found in literature. The method described in the paper might be suitable in situations when standard calculation models are not adequate.

Keywords

Medical physics Nuclear medicine Dosimetry Patient dose 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adnan Beganović
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Rahima Jašić
    • 1
  • Maja Gazdić-Šantić
    • 1
  • Amra Skopljak-Beganović
    • 1
  • Nermina Bešlić
    • 3
  • Šejla Cerić
    • 3
  • Amera Šadija
    • 3
  • Sandra Vegar-Zubović
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Radiation Protection and Medical PhysicsClinical Centre of Sarajevo UniversitySarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina
  2. 2.Faculty of ScienceUniversity of SarajevoSarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina
  3. 3.Clinic of Nuclear Medicine and EndocrinologyClinical Centre of Sarajevo UniversitySarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina
  4. 4.Clinic of RadiologyClinical Centre of Sarajevo UniversitySarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina

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