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The Concepts and Process of Consciousness Transformation

  • Elise L. Chu
Chapter
Part of the Curriculum Studies Worldwide book series (CSWW)

Abstract

This chapter seeks answers to the following questions: How might we further understand the concepts and process of consciousness transformation? What are the main barriers to be overcome in that process? What are the characteristics of various stages of progress? What disciplines and practices are necessary in various stages? What are the features of these disciplines and practices? How might we facilitate the transformation of consciousness in educational contexts? For this purpose, the main concepts and process of Buddhist spiritual practices of consciousness transformation are explored. These concepts and process include the two barriers to consciousness transformation, the transformation of consciousness into four transcendental wisdoms, the five-stage gradual path of consciousness transformation in Buddhism, the union of wisdom-side and method-side practices for consciousness transformation, and the approach of negation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise L. Chu
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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