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Learning to Embody a Non-Dualistic Worldview

  • Elise L. Chu
Chapter
Part of the Curriculum Studies Worldwide book series (CSWW)

Abstract

This chapter explores the deeds component (method-side) of spiritual practices for overcoming the dualistic worldview by means of drawing on the practices of the six perfections. Firstly, this chapter explores the order and interrelationships of the six perfections for embodying a non-dualistic worldview; it then explores the meanings, practices, and educational implications of the first four perfections. Finally, the embodiment of a non-dualistic worldview is understood through the concept of witnessing. Throughout this chapter, the dependently co-arising nature of self and world, the approach of negation, and the union of wisdom and method play crucial roles in clarifying significant concepts and practices.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise L. Chu
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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