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The Basic Neurological Examination

  • Mauro A. T. Ferreira
Chapter

Abstract

The central nervous system (CNS) differs from any other systemic system. The lungs, the pancreas, and the liver, for instance, repeat their basic morphology throughout their extensions; the brain is composed by numerous systems that are located in different brain areas. Each of those systems is responsible for a certain neurological function. The neurological examination consists of testing the patients’ neurological integrity or deficit by performing a neurological examination. Although the subject of extensive textbooks, this chapter presents the basic knowledge of the neurological examination that is feasible by any doctor or medical resident. Looking for different symptoms and signs, as well as executing certain tasks, one can identify a lesion of the central nervous system, as well as locate where the damage might be. This is of utmost importance for doctors who deal with neurological and neurosurgical residents.

Keywords

Neurological examination Neurology signs and symptoms Clinical evaluation Neurology Neurosurgery 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro A. T. Ferreira
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and RadiologyUniversity HospitalBelo HorizonteBrazil

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