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Competing Imaginaries of Solar Geoengineering

  • Jeremy BaskinEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This Chapter analyses three competing imaginaries of solar geoengineering (SGE) and their associated logics, assumptions and narratives. It identifies the most prominent of these as the ‘Imperial’ imaginary which brings together three narrative strands (‘Market’, ‘Geo-management’ and ‘Salvation’). It also identifies two oppositional imaginaries, one which is labelled the ‘Un-Natural’ imaginary, and another which is labelled the ‘Chemtrail’ imaginary and which operates in a different register. The Chapter examines the implicit and explicit values, worldviews and ontological orderings in these competing imaginaries. Each of these engages with SGE beyond a purely technoscientific framing, but none has yet managed to emerge as hegemonic. Without a hegemonic narrative it becomes difficult for SGE to be officially embraced and normalised as both applied technology and legitimate addition to climate policy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Melbourne School of GovernmentUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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