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Abstract

This chapter introduces the reader to two community radio stations—3CR Community Radio (3CR) in Melbourne and Radio Communidade Lospalos (RCL) in Lospalos. Both are leaders in their respective sectors within Australia and Timor-Leste. Community radio arose in the middle of the twentieth century from community action that demanded greater participation in, access to, and ownership of, the media. The chapter outlines a process of multi-layered data gathering at both case study locations, introduces the reader to the author’s unique position and provides an overview of the wider context and scope of the study. Ultimately the chapter presents an argument for further understanding and utilisation of media and communications that are capable of amplifying communication for social change.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juliet Fox
    • 1
  1. 1.MelbourneAustralia

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