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Ethical Behavior in Healthcare Organizations

  • Crina Simona PoruţiuEmail author
  • Ciprian Marcel Pop
  • Andra Ramona Poruţiu
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

As long as in business the goals to be pursued will be profit and efficiency, there will be voices that say there is no medical ethical standardization in all healthcare that can explain these types of objectives. From the medical ethics point of view, the primary goal is attending to the patients’ welfare, no matter the cost or gain. The research was based on the feedback provided by entrepreneurs in healthcare in order to establish where business ethics and medical ethics meet in private medical practices. The aim of this article is to display how the issues of profitability and high quality healthcare merge under the roof of ethics, business and medical alike, in private healthcare organizations, as it is believed that the medical private sector is the one environment in which these two concepts should perfectly interconnect in order to achieve success.

Keywords

Business ethics Medical ethics Healthcare Ethical behavior Entrepreneurship 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Crina Simona Poruţiu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ciprian Marcel Pop
    • 1
  • Andra Ramona Poruţiu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Marketing, Faculty of Economics and Business AdministrationBabes,-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Department of Economic Sciences, Faculty of HorticultureUniversity of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineCluj-NapocaRomania

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