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Human–AI Collaboration

  • James A. Crowder
  • John Carbone
  • Shelli Friess
Chapter

Abstract

The ability to collaboratively reason within an autonomous information processing system denotes a need and an ability to infer about information, knowledge, observations, and experiences to affect changes within the system which support performing new tasks previously unknown, or performing tasks already learned, more efficiently and effectively (Crowder, Reusable launch vehicle automated mission planning concepts, Lockheed Martin, Littleton, 1996). The act of reasoning and inferring enables an autonomous system to construct or modify representations of concepts or knowledge that the system is experiencing and learning. Artificial reasoning enables an Artificially Intelligent System (AIS) to flesh out skeletal or incomplete information or specifications about one or more of its domains (self-assessment). The research described here details architectures and algorithms for a cognitive system of Intelligent information Software Agents (ISAs) to facilitate collaborative communication between humans and artificially intelligent systems (Scally et al., Proceedings of the Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies Conference, Maui, HI, 2011).

Keywords

Artificial intelligence Human–systems interface Collaboration Human needs engineering 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Crowder
    • 1
  • John Carbone
    • 2
  • Shelli Friess
    • 3
  1. 1.Colorado Engineering Inc.Colorado SpringsUSA
  2. 2.ForcepointAustinUSA
  3. 3.Walden UniversityMinneapolisUSA

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