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Where We Fit

  • Kristopher Bryan BurrellEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter situates the evolving role of the Educational Technology Department at Hostos within the operation and mission of Hostos Community College, the City University of New York, and the educational development of Hostos students. Of New York City’s boroughs, Bronx residents have the least broadband Internet access. As a campus located in the South Bronx, one of the poorest congressional districts in the country, the college administration’s willingness to invest in developing the college’s technological capacity and educational technology offerings over the past two decades, along with the work of faculty and staff to research and implement educational technology into their courses, has been critical to student success. Since 2002, Hostos Community College has incrementally increased funding and staffing to support greater broadband capacity and technological resources, resulting in what is today, the Educational Technology Department. Faculty have also been encouraged to innovate within their classrooms and beyond the college, which has spawned fruitful collaborations between faculty and Educational Technology staff members, resulting in awards, publications, increased funding, and a culture of innovation at Hostos Community College.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Behavioral and Social Sciences DepartmentHostos Community College, CUNYBronxUSA

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