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From Groundlessness to Creativity: The Merits of Astonishment for Lacan

  • Maria Balaska
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter discusses the ethical import of the experience of astonishment, through the Lacanian idea that the question of ethics can be articulated only from the point of view of one’s relation to the real, namely, to meaning as groundless. As discussed previously, the experience of astonishment brings one in contact with what Lacan calls the “signifier in the Real” and can thus create a question about one’s involvement in meaning. The ethical importance of being involved in meaning is further explored through a discussion on what Lacan calls the ethical injunctions of psychoanalysis: “to become where it was” (“Wo Es war, soll Ich werden”) and “to ask about one’s desire.”

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Balaska
    • 1
  1. 1.University of HertfordshireHertfordshireUK

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