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Pleural Neoplasms

  • Ronald L. Eisenberg
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes mesothelioma and metastases, the two major malignant causes of pleural neoplasms, as well as fibrous tumor of the pleura and pleural lipoma.

Keywords

Mesothelioma Pleural metastases Fibrous tumor of the pleura Pleural lipoma 

Supplementary material

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Fig. e11.1 Diffuse pleural mesothelioma. Radiograph obtained after thoracentesis demonstrates the top of a large, lobulated mass (arrow) [1] (TIF 761 kb)
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Fig. e11.2 Mesothelioma. (a) Irregular pleural opacities (black arrows) that encircle the right lower lung and also demonstrate fissural extension (white arrow) (TIF 1991 kb)
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Fig. e11.2. Mesothelioma. (b) Contrast CT images show diffuse, ill-defined, enhancing soft-tissue masses (arrows) extending along the pleura of the chest wall, fissure, mediastinum, and diaphragm [3] (TIF 2380 kb)
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Fig. e11.2 Mesothelioma. (c) Contrast CT images show diffuse, ill-defined, enhancing soft-tissue masses (arrows) extending along the pleura of the chest wall, fissure, mediastinum, and diaphragm [3] (TIF 2389 kb)
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Fig. e11.3 Pleural metastases (breast carcinoma). Diffuse pleural thickening with nodular components (white arrows) accompanied by pleural effusion. Note the multiple low-attenuation metastases in the liver (black arrows) [1] (TIF 1549 kb)
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Fig. e11.4 Pleural metastases (breast carcinoma). Plastic reconstruction of the right breast following mastectomy with contralateral pleural metastases involving the left major fissure (arrows) [1] (TIF 1483 kb)
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Fig. e11.5 Pleural and extrapleural metastases (lung carcinoma). Massive chest wall destruction (arrows), accompanied by a small pleural effusion and diffuse metastatic pleural disease in the right paracardiac region [1] (TIF 2055 kb)
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Fig. e11.6 Pleural metastases (lung carcinoma). Hypervascular pleural metastases with surrounding pleural effusion (arrows). On non-contrast scans, these lesions would be substantially more difficult to visualize [1] (TIF 1476 kb)
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Fig. e11.7 Lymphoma. Multiple bilateral foci of pleural thickening with accompanying right hilar adenopathy but no pleural effusion [1] (TIF 1572 kb)
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Fig. e11.8 Small fibrous pleural tumor. (a) Soft-tissue and (b) lung window images show the absence of chest wall invasion and the slightly inhomogeneous texture of the tumor (arrows) [1] (TIF 818 kb)
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Fig. e11.9 Large fibrous tumor of the pleura. The tumor has an inhomogeneous matrix (arrows), as well as scattered calcifications (white open arrows) and thickened blood vessels (black open arrow) [1] (TIF 1416 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Hussein-Jelen T, Bankier AA, Eisenberg RL. Solid pleural tumors. AJR. 2012;198:W512–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Eisenberg RL. Clinical Imaging: An Atlas of Differential Diagnosis. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nemec SF, Bankier AA, Eisenberg RL. Lower lobe-predominant diseases of the lung. AJR. 2013;200:712–28.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Eisenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyBeth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterBostonUSA

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