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To Be Made Part of the Tobelo Society (North Moluccas)

  • Jos D. M. Platenkamp
Chapter

Abstract

Jos Platenkamp’s presence as ‘another person from elsewhere’ in a Tobelo community (North Moluccas, East Indonesia) required that one provided him with the social and cosmological relations that would shelter him from violence and misfortune. He describes in this chapter how to that end people successively assigned to him the ritual status of an in-marrying husband, of a member of the indigenous Protestant Church, and of a novice of a shamanic healer. These relations connected him with ancestors, the Christian God, and spirit beings. Only by taking part in the appropriate exchanges could such connections be forged. The gifts that he contributed reflected in their material composition as well as in their foreign provenance—his status as a ‘person from elsewhere’, a social category that complements that of ‘local’ people.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jos D. M. Platenkamp
    • 1
  1. 1.Münster UniversityMünsterGermany

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