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Nanotechnology in Cosmetics

  • Birgit HuberEmail author
  • Jens Burfeindt
Chapter

Abstract

The manufacturing and application of nanomaterials and nanostructures—nanotechnologies—are the subject matter of research activities which are increasingly gaining in significance all over the world. At present, nanomaterials can be found in many everyday products, including in cosmetics. In sunscreens, for instance, pigments with a nanodimension serve as UV filters: titanium dioxide and zinc oxide and several other substances reflect and absorb the invisible UV radiation of the sunlight and hence protect the skin from its damaging effects. These substances are used as nanomaterial since they present decisive advantages over the same substance with larger dimensions.

Keywords

Carbon black Cosmetic ingredient Cosmetic products regulation Definition Emulsion INCI Labelling Liposome MBBT Microemulsion Multiple emulsion Nanoemulsion Nanopigment Notification Silica Silicon dioxide TBPT Titanium dioxide Zinc oxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.IKWFrankfurt am MainGermany

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