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Dreams and Trauma: Late Modernity’s Discourses

  • Sandra Leigh White
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology book series (PSHST)

Abstract

The chapter takes a perspective on the understanding of dreams and trauma from 1880 to 1980 (Late Modernity). The chapter unfolds along three lines of discourse from this historical time period. First, the relationship between dreams and trauma is treated as a dialectic between hermeneutics (mind) and the materiality of the body, essentially a dialectic between the psychoanalytic and biomedical discourses. Second, dream symbolizing is equated with symptom symbolizing and trauma is equated to all dis-ease. This theme is most developed in a discussion of psychosomatics. Third, the article discusses how all three Late Modernity discourses, and their implications for subjectivity and the mind-body divide, helped shape notions of epistemology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Leigh White
    • 1
  1. 1.AtlantaUSA

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