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Lydiard Horton’s Reconstitutive Method of Dream Interpretation and the Trial-and-Error Theory of Dream Images

  • Hendrika Vande Kemp
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology book series (PSHST)

Abstract

The author reviews the reconstitutive method of dream interpretation and trial-and-error theory of dream images of Lydiard Horton (1879–1945), published first in The Journal of Abnormal Psychology (1914–1921). She illustrates Horton’s applications of his Dream Analysis Record and his extensive classification system. Horton discovered the illusion of levitation while researching the acopic sensations of super sleep, and eventually incorporated his experimental studies with adrenaline into a theory that addressed the full range of bodily sensations and their subrogation in dreams. Horton contributed two articles on trench nightmares and shell shock to National Service (National Service, 2: 323–332, 1917; The Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 13: 42–53, 1918a; The Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 13: 119–127, 1918b), emphasizing mental hygiene for the soldier. In his Columbia University doctoral dissertation, Horton (Dissertation on the Dream Problem. In Three Books. [Doctoral Dissertation, Columbia University, Biological Sciences]. Gloucester, MA: Cartesian Research Society of Philadelphia, 1925a; “Prince’s ‘Neurogram’ Concept: It’s Historical Position.” In Problems of Personality: Studies Presented to Dr. Morton Prince, Pioneer in American Psychopathology, edited by C. MacFie Campbell, Herbert Sydney Langfeld, William McDougall, Abraham Aaron Roback, and E. W. Taylor, 387–419. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1925b) approached dream images as back-trailing thought, and provided an individual dream catalogue and a random selection of dreams.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hendrika Vande Kemp
    • 1
  1. 1.DurhamUSA

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