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Providing Teachers with a Choice in Evaluation: A Case Study of Veteran Teachers’ Views

  • Sharon ConleyEmail author
  • Elizabeth Mainz
  • Laura Wellington
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies on Leadership and Learning in Teacher Education book series (PSLLTE)

Abstract

In the context of challenges in teacher evaluation and the need to develop new approaches, this qualitative research study explores one district’s approach to evaluation, in which teachers were offered three choices of evaluation: administrator (a principal or assistant principal), a peer teacher, or portfolio. Five veteran teachers and one district administrator who had participated in the evaluation system were interviewed in the spring of 2014. Results describe the evaluation options teachers chose, their perceptions of the evaluations, and the process of choosing within the choice-based system. Implications relate to ways evaluation systems might be improved, thus promoting reform efforts.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Conley
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elizabeth Mainz
    • 2
  • Laura Wellington
    • 3
  1. 1.University of California, Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA
  2. 2.Ventura Unified School DistrictVenturaUSA
  3. 3.Office of Field ExperiencesWestern Washington UniversityBellinghamUSA

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