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Formal Coordination Mechanisms

  • Tapio RaunioEmail author
  • Thomas Sedelius
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Presidential Politics book series (PASTPRPO)

Abstract

This chapter examines formal intra-executive coordination mechanisms such as joint meetings between the president and the prime minister, joint councils or ministerial committees, and administrative coordination between the offices of the president and the prime minister. It uncovers the status and legal basis of such instruments and explores how they have evolved in Finland, Lithuania, and Romania since the 1990s. It shows strong and systematic variation between the three countries, with Finland displaying a high level of formal coordination. In Lithuania and Romania, on the other hand, such coordination mechanisms are considerably weaker and more dependent on individual office-holders.

Keywords

Formal intra-executive coordination Administrative coordination Formal institutions Constitution Coordination Finland Lithuania Romania 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Management and BusinessTampere UniversityTampereFinland
  2. 2.School of Education, Health and Social SciencesDalarna UniversityFalunSweden

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