Advertisement

Beyond the Heterosexual Family Myth, or How to Queer the Family

  • Rita Béres-Deák
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life book series (PSFL)

Abstract

In the previous chapters, I have given an overview the relationship of same-sex couples with their families of origin in the 2010s Hungary. In this concluding chapter, I will examine the implications of my results in terms of theoretical issues (such as interpretations of intimate citizenship and agency or approaches to Central and Eastern Europe) and of further research on this topic. With this, I wish to question some still taken-for-granted binaries and facilitate studies that examine families in all their queerness.

Bibliography

  1. Asad, Talal. 1986. The Concept of Cultural Translation in British Social Anthropology. In Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, ed. James Clifford and George E. Marcus, 141–164. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bell, David, and Jon Binnie. 2000. The Sexual Citizen: Queer Politics and Beyond. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bertone, Chiara, and Marina Franchi. 2008. Research Report: The Experiences of Family Members of Gay and Lesbian Young People in Italy. In Family Matters: Supporting Families to Prevent Violence Against Gay and Lesbian Youth, ed. Chiara Bertone and Marina Franchi, June 20–21. Conference Proceedings, European Conference, Florence.Google Scholar
  4. Bilić, Bojan. 2016. Europe ♥ Gays? Europeanisation and Pride Parades in Serbia. In LGBT Activism and Europeanisation in the Post-Yugoslav Space: On the Rainbow Way to Europe, ed. B. Bilić, 117–154. London: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boellstorff, Tom. 2005. The Gay Archipelago: Sexuality and Nation in Indonesia. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Borneman, John. 1992. Belonging in the Two Berlins: Kin, State, Nation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bromseth, Janne. 2015. Äldre lesbiska, bisexuella och trans-feministers berättelser om vänskap och lesbisk feministisk gemenskap över tid och rum [Stories of Elderly Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Feminists About Friendship and Lesbian Feminist Community Over Time and Space]. Lambda Nordica 4 (20): 45–84.Google Scholar
  8. Brown, Gavin. 2007. Autonomy, Affinity and Play in the Spaces of Radical Queer Activism. In Geographies of Sexualities: Theory, Practices and Politics, ed. Kath Browne, Jason Lim, and Gavin Brown, 195–206. Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  9. Bruce, Katherine McFarland. 2016. Pride Parades: How a Parade Changed the World. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  11. Cappellato, Valeria, and Tiziana Manganella. 2014. Sexual Citizenship in Private and Public Space: Parents of Gay Men and Lesbians Discuss Their Experiences of Pride Parades. Journal of LGBT Family Studies 10 (1–2): 211–230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dahl, Ulrika. 2011. Notes on Femme-inist Agency. In Sexuality, Gender and Power: Intersectional and Transnational Perspectives, ed. Anna G. Jónasdottir, Valerie Bryson, and Kathleen B. Jones, 172–188. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Dasgupta, Rohit K., and Debanuj DasGupta. 2018. Introduction: Queering Digital India. In Queering Digital India: Activisms, Identities, Subjectivities, ed. Rohit K. Dasgupta and Debanuj DasGupta, 1–28. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Dave, Naisargi N. 2012. Queer Activism in India: A Story in the Anthropology of Ethics. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Davies, Peter. 1992. The Role of Disclosure in Coming Out Among Gay Men. In Modern Homosexualities: Fragments of Lesbian and Gay Experience, ed. Ken Plummer, 75–86. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  16. Decena, Carlos Ulises. 2008. Tacit Subjects. GLQ 14 (2–3): 339–359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Edenborg, Emil. 2017. Politics of Visibility and Belonging: From Russia’s “Homosexual Propaganda” Laws to the Ukraine War. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Essig, Laurie. 1999. Queer in Russia: A Story of Sex, Self, and the Other. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Finch, Janet. 1989. Family Obligations and Social Change. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  20. Glass, Valerie Q. 2014. “We Are with Family”: Black Lesbian Couples Negotiate Rituals with Extended Families. Journal of LGBT Family Studies 10 (1–2): 79–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Gorman-Murray, Andrew, Barbara Pini, and Lia Bryant. 2013. Introduction: Geographies of Ruralities and Sexualities. In Sexuality, Rurality, and Geography, ed. Andrew Gorman-Murray, Barbara Pini, and Lia Bryant, 1–20. Plymouth: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  22. Gray, Mary L. 2009. Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America. New York and London: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Gubrium, Jaber F., and James A. Holstein. 1990. What Is Family? Mountain View, London, and Toronto: Mayfield Publishing.Google Scholar
  24. H. Sas, Judit. 1978. A nagycsalád jellegzetességei a mai magyar falusi társadalomban [Characteristics of Extended Families in Contemporary Hungarian Village Society]. In A változó család [The Changing Family], ed. László Cseh-Szombathy, 66–84. Budapest: Kossuth.Google Scholar
  25. Halberstam, Judith. 1998. Female Masculinity. Durham and London: Durham University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Halperin, David. 2012. How to Be Gay? Cambridge and London: Belknap Press.Google Scholar
  27. Hayden, Corinne P. 2004. Gender, Genetics and Generation: Reformulating Biology in Lesbian Kinship. In Kinship and Family: An Anthropological Reader, ed. Robert Parkin and Linda Stone, 378–934. Boston: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  28. Healey, Dan. 2018. Russian Homophobia from Stalin to Sochi. London, Oxford, New York, New Delhi, and Sydney: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  29. Herdt, Gilbert, and Bruce Koff. 2000. Something to Tell You: The Road Families Travel When a Child Is Gay. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Hicks-Bartlett, Sharon. 2000 Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The Labyrinth of Working and Parenting in a Poor Community. In Coping with Poverty: The Social Contexts of Neighborhood, Work, and Family in the African-American Community, ed. Sheldon Danziger and Ann Chich Lin, 27–51. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  31. Hochschild, Arlie Russell. 2003 [1989]. The Second Shift. London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  32. Jackson, Stevie. 2005. Sexuality, Heterosexuality and Gender Hierarchy: Getting Our Priorities Straight. In Thinking Straight: The Power, the Promise, and the Paradox of Heterosexuality, ed. Chrys Ingraham, 15–38. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  33. Kendall. 1999. Women in Lesotho and the (Western) Construction of Homophobia. In Female Desires: Same-Sex Relations and Transgender Practices Across Cultures, ed. Evelyn Blackwood and Saskia E. Wieringa, 157–180. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Kováts, Eszter, and Maari Põim (eds.). 2015. Gender as Symbolic Glue: The Position and Role of Conservative and Far Right Parties in the Anti-gender Mobilizations in Europe. Budapest: Friedrich-Ebert Stiftung.Google Scholar
  35. Kuhar, Roman. 2007. The Family Secret: Parents of Homosexual Sons and Daughters. In Beyond the Pink Curtain: Everyday Life of LGBT People in Eastern Europe, ed. Roman Kuhar and Judit Takács, 35–48. Ljubljana: Mirovni Inštitut.Google Scholar
  36. Kuhar, Roman. 2011. The Heteronormative Panopticon and the Transparent Closet of the Public Space in Slovenia. In De-centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspectives, ed. Robert Kulpa and Joanna Mizielińska, 149–166. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Kulpa, Robert, and Joanna Mizielińska. 2011. ‘Contemporary Peripheries’: Queer Studies, Circulation of Knowledge and East/West Divide. In De-centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspectives, ed. Robert Kulpa and Joanna Mizielińska, 11–26. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  38. Lampland, Martha. 1995. The Object of Labor: Commodification in Socialist Hungary. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  39. Levy, Denise L., and Patricia Reeves. 2011. Resolving Identity Conflict: Gay, Lesbian and Queer Individuals with a Christian Upbringing. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services 23 (1): 53–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Lewin, Ellen. 1998. Recognizing Ourselves: Ceremonies of Lesbian and Gay Commitment. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Lewin, Ellen. 2004. Does Marriage Have a Future? Journal of Marriage and Family 66 (4): 1000–1006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Lewin, Ellen. 2009. Gay Fatherhood: Narratives of Family and Citizenship in America. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  43. Lind, Amy. 2010. Introduction: Development, Global Governance, and Sexual Subjectivities. In Development, Sexual Rights and Global Governance, ed. Amy Lind, 1–21. London and New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Lukács, Dénes. 2010. Pszichoterapeuták a homoszexualitásról. Válaszok egy körkérdésre [Psychotherapists’ Answers to a Question About Homosexuality]. Thalassa 4: 119–120.Google Scholar
  45. Manalansan IV, Martin F. 1997. In the Shadows of Stonewall: Examining Gay Transnational Politics and the Diaspora Dilemma. In The Politics of Culture in the Shadow of Capital, ed. Lisa Lowe and David Lloyd, 485–505. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Manalansan IV, Martin F. 2003. Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  47. Marshall, T.H. 1965 [1949]. Class, Citizenship and Social Development. New York: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
  48. McLennan, Josie. 2011. Love in the Time of Communism: Intimacy and Sexuality in the GDR. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Mészáros, György. 2018. Az LMBT+ identitások és mozgalom politikai gazdaságtana a félperiférián [The Political Economy of LGBT+ Identities and Movement on the Semi-Periphery]. Fordulat 2 (24): 215–241.Google Scholar
  50. Mizielińska, Joanna, Marta Abramovicz, and Agata Stasińska. 2015. Families of Choice in Poland: Family Life of Non-heterosexual People. Warsaw: Institut Psychologii Polskiej Akademii Nauk.Google Scholar
  51. Morgan, David H.J. 1996. Family Connections: An Introduction to Family Studies. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  52. Morgensen, Scott. 2009. Back and Forth to the Land: Negotiating Rural and Urban Sexuality Among the Radical Faeries. In Out in Public: Reinventing Lesbian/Gay Anthropology in a Globalizing World, ed. Ellen Lewin and William L. Leap, 143–163. Chichester: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  53. Muñoz, Lorena. 2010. Brown, Queer and Gendered: Queering the Latina/o ‘Street-Scapes’ in Los Angeles. In Queer Methods and Methodologies: Intersecting Queer Theories and Social Science Research, ed. Kath Browne and Catherine J. Nash, 55–68. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  54. Nardi, Peter M. 1999. Gay Men’s Friendships: Invincible Communities. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  55. Neumann, Eszter, and Júlia Vajda. 2008. …onnantól kezdve ilyen hivatásos zsidóként működöm [From That Point I Have Been Functioning as Sort of a Professional Jew]. In Tükörszilánkok. Kádár-korszakok a személyes emlékezetben [Mirror Splinters: Kádár-Eras in Personal Memory], ed. Kovács Éva, 110–144. Budapest: MTA Szociológiai Kutatóintézet – 1956-os Intézet.Google Scholar
  56. Nicolae, Lavinia M. 2009. The Marriage Between Kinship and Sexuality in New Mexico’s Domestic Partnership Debate. In Out in Public: Reinventing Lesbian/Gay Anthropology in a Globalizing World, ed. Ellen Lewin and William L. Leap, 338–356. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  57. Padgug, Robert. 1989. Sexual Matters: On Conceptualizing Sexuality in History. In Passion and Power: Sexuality in History, ed. Kathy Peiss and Christina Simmons, 14–35. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Pittaway, Mark. 2002. Retreat from Collective Protest: Household, Gender, Work and Popular Opposition in Stalinist Hungary. In Rebellious Families: Household Strategies and Collective Action in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, ed. Jan Kok, 199–230. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books.Google Scholar
  59. Richardson, Diane. 2005. Claiming Citizenship? Sexuality, Citizenship and Lesbian Feminist Theory. In Thinking Straight: The Power, the Promise, and the Paradox of Heterosexuality, ed. Chrys Ingraham, 63–84. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  60. Rofel, Lisa. 2007. Desiring China: Experiments in Neoliberalism, Sexuality, and Public Culture. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  61. Roseneil, Sasha, and Mariya Stoilova. 2011. Heteronormativity, Intimate Citizenship and the Regulation of Same-Sex Sexualities in Bulgaria. In De-centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspectives, ed. Robert Kulpa and Joanna Mizielińska, 167–190. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Ryan-Flood, Róisín. 2009. Lesbian Motherhood: Gender, Families and Sexual Citizenship. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  63. Savin-Williams, Rich C. 1989. Parental Influences on the Self-Esteem of Gay and Lesbian Youths: A Reflected Appraisals Model. In Gay and Lesbian Youth, ed. Gilbert Herdt, 93–109. New York and London: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  64. Seidman, Steven. 2004. Beyond the Closet: The Transformation of Gay and Lesbian Life. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  65. Sinfield, Alan. 1998. Gay and After. London: Serpent’s Tail.Google Scholar
  66. Sommerville, Shioban B. 2000. Queering the Color Line: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  67. Sorainen, Antu. 2014. Queer Personal Lives, Inheritance Perspectives, and Small Places. Lambda Nordica 19 (3–4): 31–52.Google Scholar
  68. Stacey, Judith. 1990. Brave New Families: Stories of Domestic Upheaval in Late Twentieth Century America. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  69. Stack, Carol. 1974. All Our Kin. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  70. Stella, Francesca. 2015. Lesbian Lives in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia. Post/Socialism and Gendered Sexualities. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  71. Stout, Noelle M. 2014. After Love: Queer Intimacy and Erotic Economies in Post-Soviet Cuba. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  72. Sullivan-Blum, Constance R. 2009. “It’s Adam and Eve, Not Adam and Steve”: What’s at Stake in the Construction of Contemporary American Christian Homophobia. In Homophobias: Lust and Loathing Across Time and Space, ed. David A.B. Murray, 48–63. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  73. Švab, Alenka, and Roman Kuhar. 2014. The Transparent and Family Closets: Gay Men and Lesbians and Their Families of Origin. Journal of LGBT Family Studies 10 (1–2): 15–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Sztompka, Piotr. 1993. Civilizational Incompetence: The Trap of Post-communist Societies. Zeitschrift Für Soziologie 22 (2): 85–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Szulc, Lukasz. 2011. Queer in Poland: Under Construction. In Queer in Europe: Contemporary Case Studies, ed. Lisa Downing and Robert Gillett, 159–172. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  76. Szulc, Lukasz. 2017. Transnational Homosexuals in Communist Poland: Cross-Border Flows in Gay and Lesbian Magazines. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  77. Takács, Judit, and Ivett Szalma. 2010. Social Acceptance of Lesbian Women and Gay Men in Hungary. In European Social Register 2010: Social Attitudes in Europe, ed. László Füstös, László Guba, and Ivett Szalma, 224–244. Budapest: L’Harmattan.Google Scholar
  78. Takács, Judit, and Ivett Szalma. 2013. Az azonos nemű párok általi örökbefogadással kapcsolatos attitűdök Magyarországon [Attitudes Towards Adoption by Same-Sex Couples in Hungary]. Socio.hu, 2013.1.1.
  79. Tereskinas, Arturas. 2008. Lithuanian Gays and Lesbians “Coming Out” in the Public/Private Divide: Sexual Citizenship Lithuanian Style. In Gender and Citizenship in a Multicultural Context, ed. E.H. Oleksy, A. Pető, and B. Waaldijk, 93–108. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  80. Tilly, Louise A., and Joan W. Scott. 1987. Women, Work and Family. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  81. Tóth, Eszter Zsófia, and András Murai. 2014. Szex és szocializmus [Sex and Socialism]. Budapest: Libri.Google Scholar
  82. Udvarnoky, Virág. 2008. Elhunyt korszakról vagy jót, vagy semmit [Don’t Slander a Deceased Era]. In Tükörszilánkok. Kádár-korszakok a személyes emlékezetben [Mirror Splinters: Kádár-Eras in Personal Memory], ed. Kovács Éva, 80–96. Budapest: MTA Szociológiai Kutatóintézet – 1956-os Intézet.Google Scholar
  83. Verdery, Katherine. 1996. What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next? Princeton: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Warner, Michael. 1999. The Trouble with Normal: Sex, Politics and the Ethics of Queer Life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  85. Weston, Kath. 1991. Families We Choose: Lesbians, Gays, Kinship. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  86. Whisman, Vera. 2000. Coming Out. In Lesbian Histories and Cultures, ed. Bonnie Zimmermann, 186–188. New York and London: Garland.Google Scholar
  87. Williams, Walter L. 1998. Social Acceptance of Same-Sex Relationships in Families: Models from Other Cultures. In Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identities in Families: Psychological Perspectives, ed. Charlotte J. Patterson and Anthony R. D’Augelli, 53–74. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  88. Young, Michael, and Peter Wilmott. 1957. Family and Kinship in East London. Harmondsworth: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Béres-Deák
    • 1
  1. 1.BudapestHungary

Personalised recommendations