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Introduction

  • Rita Béres-Deák
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life book series (PSFL)

Abstract

In this first chapter of the book ‘Queer Families in Hungary,’ I set the framework for my book. In terms of theory, I address the notion of intimate citizenship, especially as it relates to kinship and agency. Then I describe the community where I did research, also addressing the groups underrepresented in this community and my research. I will also address issues of ethics and positionality in the case of an LGBTQ activist studying a relatively closeted community in a homophobic national context.

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Béres-Deák
    • 1
  1. 1.BudapestHungary

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