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Animal Protocol

  • Laurel D. Schantz
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Translational Stroke Research book series (SSTSR)

Abstract

This chapter outlines the important points that must be considered in developing an animal protocol using a model of acute neurological injury. It highlights the issues that should be considered in designing such a study as well as the issues that must be addressed when writing a protocol for submission to the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). The key issues for regulatory compliance are addressed.

Keywords

Animal protocol IACUC Regulatory compliance 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laurel D. Schantz
    • 1
  1. 1.La JollaUSA

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