Advertisement

Case Study Research

  • Sally Broughton Micova
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces case studies, which are a commonly used methodological approach in media policy research. It describes how case studies can be theoretically informed and very useful for uncovering the complexity typical of policy processes and challenges. Case studies are usually mixed method investigations, so in covering the steps of conducting case studies, this chapter focuses on the selection of cases and of the methods to be combined. Case studies can be messy, revealing a great deal of detail and often an abundance of data. This chapter explains that if researchers rely on conceptually informed structure, they can deal with this challenge and conduct case studies or multi-case investigations that can help us understand complex phenomena in our media and communications environment and lead to both theory building and policy contributions.

References

  1. Broughton Micova, S. (2013). Small and resistant: Europeanization in media governance in Slovenia and Macedonia. Ph.D. Monograph, London School of Economics and Political Science, London.Google Scholar
  2. Bryman, A. (2012). Social research methods (4th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Gaskell, G. (2000). Individual and group interviewing. In M. W. Bauer & G. Gaskell (Eds.), Qualitative researching with text, image and sound: A practical handbook (pp. 38–56). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Gauthier, J. L. (2016). Digital not diversity? Changing aboriginal media policy at the National Film Board of Canada. International Journal of Cultural Policy, 22(3), 331–352.  https://doi.org/10.1080/10286632.2014.985666.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. George, A. L., & Bennett, A. (2005). Case studies and theory development in the social sciences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  6. Gillham, B. (2000). Case study research methods. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
  7. Greene, J. C. (2007). Mixed methods in social inquiry (1st ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  8. Hall, B., & Howard, K. (2008). A synergistic approach. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 2(3), 248–269.  https://doi.org/10.1177/1558689808314622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Lunt, P., & Livingstone, S. (2011). Media regulation: Governance and the interests of citizens and consumers. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  10. Milosavljević, M., & Broughton Micova, S. (2016). Banning, blocking and boosting: Twitter’s solo-regulation of expression. Medijske studije, 7(13), 43–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ognyanova, N. (2009). Bulgarian media policy and law: How much Europeanization. Central European Journal of Communications, 2(1/2), 27–42.Google Scholar
  12. Plano Clark, V. L., Creswell, J., O’Neil Green, D., & Shope, R. J. (2008). Mixing quantitative and qualitative approaches: An introduction to emergent mixed methods research. In S. N. Hesse-Biber & P. Leavy (Eds.), The handbook of emergent methods (pp. 363–388). New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  13. Ragin, C. C. (1987). The comparative method: Moving beyond qualitative and quantitative strategies. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  14. Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. Los Angeles; London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Stake, R. E., & Stake, R. E. (1995). The art of case study research. Thousand Oaks, CA; London: Sage.Google Scholar
  16. Stake, R. E., & Stake, R. E. (2006). Multiple case study analysis. New York; London: Guilford.Google Scholar
  17. Sutherland, E. (2016). The case study in telecommunications policy research. Info, 18(1), 16–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Swanborn, P. G. (2010). Case study research: What, why and how? Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Thamae, L. Z. (2015). A review of Lesotho’s digital migration challenges: Policy lessons from global and regional experiences. International Journal of Digital Television, 6(3), 331–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Van Den Bulck, H., & Moe, H. (2012). To test or not to test: Comparing the development of ex ante public service media assessments in Flanders and Norway. International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics, 8(1), 31–49.Google Scholar
  21. Yin, R. K. (2003a). Applications of case study research (2nd ed.). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  22. Yin, R. K. (2003b). Case study research: Design and methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  23. Yin, R. K. (2014). Case study research: Design and methods (5th ed.). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Stake, R. E., & Stake, R. E. (2006). Multiple case study analysis. New York; London: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Sutherland, E. (2016). The case study in telecommunications policy research. Info, 18(1), 16–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Swanborn, P. G. (2010). Case study research: What, why and how? Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Yin, R. K. (2018). Case study research: Design and methods (6th ed.). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally Broughton Micova
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication StudiesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK

Personalised recommendations