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Analyzing Talk and Text III: Discourse Analysis

  • Christopher Ali
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces critical discourse analysis (CDA) and demonstrates its applicability to critical media policy studies. The chapter progresses iteratively, beginning with a brief discussion of discourse, followed by an outline of critical discourse analysis. It then demonstrates how CDA is an appropriate methodological tool for media policy studies and walks the reader through how to apply CDA to media policy. Following examples from studies on American broadcasting policy and British digital media policy, it concludes with a summary of both the limitations and benefits of CDA.

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Further Reading

  1. Ali, C. (2017). Media localism: The policies of place. Urbana-Champagne: University of Illinois Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Howarth, D. (2000). Discourse. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Lentz, R. (2011). Regulation as linguistic engineering. In R. Mansell & M. Raboy (Eds.), The handbook of global media and communications policy (pp. 432–448). Malden: Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Streeter, T. (2013). Policy, politics, and discourse. Communication, Culture & Critique, 6(4), 488–501.  https://doi.org/10.1111/cccr.12028.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. van Dijk, T. (1993). Principles of critical discourse analysis. Discourse Society, 4(2), 249–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Wodak, R., & Meyer, M. (Eds.). (2009). Methods for critical discourse analysis. Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Ali
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Media StudiesUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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