Advertisement

National Quality of Life and Well-Being: 50 Years of Development and Well-Being Challenges and Progress

  • Richard J. Estes
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 78)

Abstract

Thus far, we have documented major shifts that have occurred in quality of life and well-being worldwide from 1970 to the present. Along with selected estimates for the next 2 years, these data illustrate national trends in well-being by decade over the most recent 50-year period. The author has previously reported on interim trends for the period 1970–2020. These trends have been strongly positive and forward-oriented over the entire period covered by the earlier reports (Estes, 1976, 1988, 1998a, 1998b, 2007, 2010, 2012a, 2012b, 2015b, 2018). In recent years, and with other scholars working on the same period, national studies also have been undertaken on countries characterized by extensive histories of diversity-related social conflict that, in the case of North Africa and West Asia, has taken the form of religiously inspired acts of terrorism in both their own and other nations (el-Aswad, 2019; Sirgy, Estes, & Rahtz, 2018). Targets of the latter have been primarily major population and financial centers in Western nations (of Europe and North America) as well as the national capitals and centers of national defense and defense intelligence within these countries (Central Intelligence Agency, 2018). Though the number of acts of international terrorism has successfully been reduced in the last several years, even so, horrific acts of terrorism continue to take place in the countries of origin and their nearby neighbors, e.g., Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, among others.

References

  1. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). (2018). World factbook, 2018. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of State.Google Scholar
  2. El-Aswad, E. (2019). Quality of life and policy issues among the Middle East and North African countries. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International. in press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Estes, R. J. (1976). The social progress of nations. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  4. Estes, R. J. (1988). Trends in world social development: The social progress of nations, 1970–1987. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  5. Estes, R. J. (1998a). Social development trends in the successor states to the former Soviet Union: The search for a new paradigm. In K. R. Hope (Ed.), Challenges of transformation and transition from centrally planned to market economies (UNCRD Research Report Series No. 26) (pp. 13–30). Nagoya, Japan: United Nations Centre for Regional Development.Google Scholar
  6. Estes, R. J. (1998b). Trends in world social development, 1970–95: Development prospects for a new century. Journal of Developing Societies, 14(1), 11–39.Google Scholar
  7. Estes, R. J. (2007). Development challenges and opportunities confronting economies in transition. Social Indicators Research, 83(3), 375–411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Estes, R. J. (2010). The world social situation: Development challenges at the outset of a new century. Social Indicators Research, 98, 363–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Estes, R. J. (2012a). Economies in transition: Continuing challenges to quality of life. In K. Land, A. C. Michalos, & M. J. Sirgy (Eds.), Handbook of quality of life research (pp. 433–457). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer International Publishers.Google Scholar
  10. Estes, R. J. (2012b). Failed and failing states: Is quality of life possible? In K. Land, A. C. Michalos, & M. J. Sirgy (Eds.), Handbook of quality of life research (pp. 555–580). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer International Publishers.Google Scholar
  11. Estes, R. J. (2014). Disadvantaged populations. In A. C. Michalos (Ed.), Encyclopedia of quality of life and well-being research (pp. 1654–1658). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer International Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Estes, R. J. (2015a). Development trends among the world’s socially least developed countries: Reasons for cautious optimism. In B. Spooner (Ed.), Globalization in progress: Understanding and working with world urbanization. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum Press.Google Scholar
  13. Estes, R. J. (2015b). Trends in world social development: The search for global well-being. In W. Glatzer, L. Camfield, V. Møller, & M. Rojas (Eds.), Global handbook of quality of life: Exploration of well-being of nations and continents. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer International Publishers.Google Scholar
  14. Estes, R. J. (2018). Disparities and wealth. In G. Brule & C. Suter (Eds.), Wealth and Subjective well-being. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer. in preparation.Google Scholar
  15. Estes, R. J. (2019). The Social Progress of Nations Revisited: 1970–2018. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Social Indicators Research Book series. in preparation.Google Scholar
  16. Estes, R. J., & Sirgy, M. J. (2017). The pursuit of human well-being: The untold global history. Cham: Switzerland: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Estes, R. J., & Sirgy, M. J. (2018). Advances in human well-being: Towards a better world. London/New York: Rowman & Littlefield Ltd.Google Scholar
  18. Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World happiness report, 2017. New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.Google Scholar
  19. International Social Security Association. (2018). Social security programs throughout the world. [Publication Web site.] Geneva, Switzerland: International Social Security Association. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/ssptw/
  20. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. (2018). OECD. Stat. [Database]. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from https://stats.oecd.org/
  21. Quilligan, J. B. (2002). The Brandt equation: 21st century blueprint for the new global economy. Philadelphia: Center for Global Negotiations. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://www.brandt21forum.info/Report_TableofContents.htm Google Scholar
  22. Selian, A. N., & McKnight, L. (2017). The role of technology in the history of well-being: Transformative market phenomena over time. In R. J. Estes & M. J. Sirgy (Eds.), The pursuit of human well-being: The untold global history (pp. 639–687). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Sirgy, M. J., Estes, R. J., & Rahtz, D. R. (2018). Combatting jihadist terrorism: A quality-of-life perspective. Journal of Applied Research in Quality of Life. (on; line).  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-017-9574-z CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). (2018). SIPRI yearbook 2018: Armaments, disarmament and international security. Stockholm: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.Google Scholar
  25. Tiliouine, H., & Estes, R. J. (2016). The state of social progress of Islamic societies: Social, political, economic, and ideological challenges. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Transparency International. (2018). Corruptions perception index. [Organization Web site.] Berlin: Transparency International. Retrieved August 24, 2018 from https://www.transparency.org/research/cpi/overview
  27. United Nations. (2014). “Sea-locked countries” face up to climate change. UN News, September 2. Retrieved from https://news.un.org/en/audio/2014/09/591762/
  28. United Nations. (2017). Enhancing the participation of the landlocked states in the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14. [Meeting]. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://unohrlls.org/event/enhancing-participation-landlocked-states-implementation-sustainable-development-goal-sdg-14/
  29. United Nations Commission on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). (2018). List of least developed countries. Geneva, Switzerland: United Nations Commission on Trade and Development. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://unctad.org/en/pages/ALDC/Least%20Developed%20Countries/UN-list-of-Least-Developed-Countries.aspx Google Scholar
  30. United Nations Development Programme. (2016). Ending poverty: Millennium development goals and beyond 2015. New York: United Nations Development Programme. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/ Google Scholar
  31. United Nations Development Programme. (2017). Human development reports, 2017. New York: United Nations Development Programme. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://hdr.undp.org/en/year/2017
  32. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. (2017). Refugee and migrant report (p. 2017). Geneva, Switzerland: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.Google Scholar
  33. World Bank. (2018). World development report 2018: Learning to realize education’s promise. Washington, DC: World Bank. Retrieved August 29, 2018 from http://www.worldbank.org/en/publication/wdr2018 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Estes
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social Policy & PracticeUniversity of PennsylvaniaNarberthUSA

Personalised recommendations