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Biomechatronic Simulator for Fencing Training Using Virtual Reality Technology

  • Andrzej BieniekEmail author
  • Anna Szczygioł
  • Miłosz Chrzan
  • Piotr Wodarski
  • Michał Morys
  • Bogdan Bacik
  • Grzegorz Juras
  • Robert Michnik
  • Katarzyna Paszek
  • Marek Gzik
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 934)

Abstract

Fencing is a combat sport in which fencers compete in three weapons: foil, saber and epee. They differ from each other in blade type, valid target and scoring technique. Although the fundamental role of speed, coordination and sensory-motor skills in fencing is indisputable, merely rapid and correct accomplishment of a movement does not ensure success. Outright bout against an opponent requires high level of perceiving, information processing and accurate decision-making. Thus, in fencing, as a ‘game of anticipation and deception’, technical abilities are just a tool used to execute chosen strategy and tactics. The repeatability of joints’ movements relevant to the lunge performance was measured. Shoulder, elbow and wrist joint of the upper arm, hip joint and knee leg movements were checked in order to match and determine the number of necessary recordings. The study covered 10 athletes, 6 saber and 4 epee fencers, members of Polish National Team. There is a repeatability in measured movements. The weak and negative correlation coefficient is observed just between several subjects. The strong correlation coefficient was noted across trials within a single subject. This result implies, that frequently repeated movements create stable movement patterns which is individual for each of the subjects. According to individual character of performed actions, animation database should contain possible highest number of recorded athletes. Just widening of database can provide expected level of diversity to fencing training and prevent the effect of ‘learning’ just one opponent.

Keywords

Virtual reality Fencing Simulator Motion capture Biomechatronics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrzej Bieniek
    • 1
    Email author
  • Anna Szczygioł
    • 2
  • Miłosz Chrzan
    • 1
  • Piotr Wodarski
    • 1
  • Michał Morys
    • 2
  • Bogdan Bacik
    • 2
  • Grzegorz Juras
    • 2
  • Robert Michnik
    • 1
  • Katarzyna Paszek
    • 1
  • Marek Gzik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomechatronics, Faculty of Biomedical EngineeringSilesian University of TechnologyZabrzePoland
  2. 2.Department of Human Motor Behavior Jerzy KukuczkaAcademy of Physical EducationKatowicePoland

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