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Colonial Visions: The British Empire in Early Anglophone and Francophone Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy

  • Allan Weiss
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Global Science Fiction book series (SGSF)

Abstract

Anglophone and Francophone Canadian fantastic literature was born in the British Empire during the height of its power. The image of Empire in the sf and fantasy of the two linguistic groups differs, yet there are similarities in how they present the Empire’s role. Generally, the Empire is seen as a protector for Anglophone writers and an oppressor for Francophones, but texts such as Ralph Centennius’s “The Dominion in 1983” (1883), W. H. C. Lawrence’s The Storm of ’92 (1889), Jules-Paul Tardivel’s Pour la patrie (1895), and Ubald Paquin’s La cité dans les fers (1925), reveal that authors in both cultures portray future Canadas or Québecs that are increasingly independent from Britain, arguing for sovereignty while benefiting from political principles handed down by that Empire.

Keywords

James de Mille Ralph Centennius Jules-Paul Tradival Ubald Paquin Colonialism W. H. C. Lawrence 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan Weiss
    • 1
  1. 1.York UniversityTorontoCanada

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