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The Missing Link: Bridging the Species Divide in Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam Trilogy

  • Dunja M. Mohr
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Global Science Fiction book series (SGSF)

Abstract

Addressing Atwood’s earlier role in the construction of the myth of Canadian identity in Survival (1972), this chapter sees the writer’s postapocalyptic cycle as reworking the binarism of the “two founding nations” to move beyond both the two solitudes and the mosaic metaphor, extending survival to interspeciesism on a planetary level. In the MaddAddam trilogy (2003–2013), Atwood expands the notion of multiculturalism to that of multispeciesism, arguing for the construction of bridges between species in order to create a form of multispecies justice and suggesting multiple interdependencies.

Keywords

Margaret Atwood MaddAddam trilogy Postapocalyptic fiction Utopia/dystopia Posthumanism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dunja M. Mohr
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ErfurtErfurtGermany

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