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Psychopharmacology: Special Considerations When Working with Young Children

  • Justin A. BarterianEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Pediatric School Psychology book series (PSP)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the special considerations associated with the use of psychotropic medications in young children. Emphasis is placed on the importance of a thorough cost-to-benefit analysis prior to and during psychiatric treatment. The paucity of available efficacy data in young children and the unique short- and long-term side effect concerns are reviewed. A set of references and web-based materials are provided to readers for additional information.

Keywords

Psychopharmacology Psychotropic medication Young children Preschool Adverse events Psychostimulants Antidepressants 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral HealthOhio State University Wexner Medical CenterColumbusUSA

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