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Bariatric Surgery and Stone Risk

  • Jillian ReeceEmail author
  • R. Wesley Vosburg
  • Nitender Goyal
Chapter
Part of the Nutrition and Health book series (NH)

Abstract

Bariatric surgery patients represent a diverse group of individuals often with multiple coexisting medical problems. Nephrolithiasis has been shown to occur at variable rates relative to the specific procedure that individuals have undergone. The following chapter discusses stone risk factors, biochemical changes, and treatment strategies available for postoperative bariatric surgery patients.

Keywords

Bariatric surgery Kidney stones Urolithiasis Roux-en-Y gastric bypass Sleeve gastrectomy Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding 

Abbreviations

BMI

Body mass index

BPD/DS

Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch

CaOx

Calcium oxalate GI Gastrointestinal

LAGB

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

PCC

Potassium citrate and calcium citrate

RYGB

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

SG

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

SS

Supersaturation

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jillian Reece
    • 1
    Email author
  • R. Wesley Vosburg
    • 2
  • Nitender Goyal
    • 3
  1. 1.Tufts Medical Center, Weight and Wellness CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Mount Auburn HospitalWalthamUSA
  3. 3.Tufts Medical CenterBostonUSA

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