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Repeatability of Selected Kinematic Parameters During Gait on Treadmill in Virtual Reality

  • Piotr WodarskiEmail author
  • Mateusz Stasiewicz
  • Andrzej Bieniek
  • Jacek Jurkojć
  • Robert Michnik
  • Miłosz Chrzan
  • Marek Gzik
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 925)

Abstract

Gait is the most important form of human locomotion and can be decribed by kinematics quantities and stabilographics paramaters. It is possible to determie those parameters from the distribution of forces on the ground. The purpose of this study is determining of repeatability of gait on treadmill in virtual reality. Thirty-two healthy adults have been exmained. In this study each person has been tested 6 times (natural gait on the threadmill and 5 times gait on the treadmil in virtual reality). Between each part of the study was 240 s break, during that person was stimulated by various stimuli, like increseed or decresed speed of treadmill or virtual scenery. All this to disperse the examined person and to maximize the destabilization of the posture of this person. In this study was concluded that gait on the treadmill in virtual reality is repetitive in reference to measured values of selected kinematic parameters determined by distribution of forces on the ground. Results of this study were confronted with literature review. The study are first attempt describing of impact of VR environments on human gait.

Keywords

Human gait Gait kinematic parameters Virtual reality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Piotr Wodarski
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mateusz Stasiewicz
    • 1
  • Andrzej Bieniek
    • 1
  • Jacek Jurkojć
    • 1
  • Robert Michnik
    • 1
  • Miłosz Chrzan
    • 1
  • Marek Gzik
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Department of BiomechatronicsSilesian University of TechnologyGliwicePoland

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