Advertisement

Literature and Reading Communities

  • Jeneen Naji
  • Ganakumaran Subramaniam
  • Goodith WhiteEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores how language learners can benefit from belonging to a reading community and argues that the notion of community is central to theories of how language learning can be supported, for example, through scaffolding (Vygotsky) and communities of practice (Lave and Wenger). It describes different kinds of reading community, such as book clubs, book blogging, social networks, and poetry circles, and the ways in which they can help learners to engage with literary texts. It does, however, question whether the democratisation of literary criticism in such groups may lead to the ‘death’ of the expert critic, and a decline in the standards we expect from a literary text.

References

  1. Amazon. Available at www.amazon.com or www.amazon.co.uk. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  2. Clark, C. (2011). Setting the Baseline: The National Literacy Trust’s First Annual Survey into Reading—2010. London: National Literacy Trust.Google Scholar
  3. Clark, C. (2015). Children’s and Young People’s Reading in 2014. Findings from the 2014 National Literacy Trust’s Annual Survey. London: National Literacy Trust.Google Scholar
  4. Dabek, M. (2016). Reading Austen Communally. Available at http://www.meredithdabek.com/2016/02/reading-austen-communally-part-1/. Accessed April 15, 2016.
  5. Dean, M. (2016). Instagram Poets Society: Selfie Age Gives New Life and Following into Poetry. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/26/instagram-poets-society-social-media-phenomenon. Accessed February 16, 2018.
  6. Delwiche, A., & Henderson, J. J. (2012). The Participatory Cultures Handbook. New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. DuQuette, J. P. (2011). Buckling Down: Initiating an EFL Reading Circle in a Casual Online Learning Group. JALTCALL Journal, 7(1), 79–92. Available at http://journal.jaltcall.org/articles/7_1_DuQuette.pdf. Accessed March 26, 2018
  8. Ever Jane. (2016). Available at http://www.everjane.com/. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  9. Facebook. Available at www.facebook.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  10. Flint, K. (1993). The Woman Reader 1837–1914. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  11. Flood, A. (2012). Books Bloggers Are Harming Literature, Warns Booker Prize Head Judge. The Guardian. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/sep/25/books-bloggers-literature-booker-prize-stothard. Accessed February 16, 2018.
  12. Flores, L. (2017). La literatura electrónica latinoamericana, caribeña y global: generaciones, fases y tradiciones. Artelogie, 11. Available at http://journals.openedition.org/artelogie/1590. Accessed February 16, 2018.
  13. Foasberg, N. M. (2012). Online Reading Communities: From Book Clubs to Book Blogs. The Journal of Social Media in Society, 1(1), 31–53.Google Scholar
  14. Gee, J. P. (2005). Semiotic Social Spaces to Affinity Spaces: From the Age of Mythology to Today’s Schools’. In D. Barton & K. Tusting (Eds.), Beyond Communities of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Goodreads. Available at www.goodreads.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  16. Hall, R. M. (2003). The ‘Oprahfication’ of Literacy: Reading ‘Oprah’s Book Club’. College English, 65(6), 646–667.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Hillery, G. A. (1955). Definitions of Community: Areas of Agreement. Rural Sociology, 20, 111–123.Google Scholar
  18. Hodge, S., Robinson, J., & Davis, J. (2007). Reading Between the Lines: The Experiences. Medical Humanities, 33(2), 100–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Instagram. Available at www.instagram.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  20. Jane Austen Variations. Available at http://austenvariations.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  21. Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Kong, A., & Fitch, E. (2002). Using Book Club to Engage Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners in Reading, Writing, and Talking About Books. The Reading Teacher, 56(4), 352–362.Google Scholar
  23. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Lederman, M. (2017, July 19). Meet Atticus the Most Famous Canadian Poet You’ve Never Heard Of. The Globe and Mail. Available at https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/meet-atticus-the-most-famous-canadian-poet-youve-never-heard-of/article35730003/. Accessed July 26, 2017.
  25. LibraryThing. Available at www.librarything.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  26. Lizzie Bennet Diaries. Available at https://www.youtube.com/user/LizzieBennet. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  27. O’Neill, S. (2014). Ophelian Negotiations: Remediating the Girl on YouTube. Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. Available at http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/1281/show. Accessed April 16, 2016.
  28. Ophelia’s Vlogs. YouTube. Available athttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weW7q8lblEg&list=PL1pSKq2j2G5jiG37sJrcCwSeg7GxdbPtD. Accessed April 16, 2016.
  29. Perfetti, C. A. (1991). Representations and Awareness in the Acquisition of Reading Competence. In L. Rieben & C. A. Perfetti (Eds.), Learning to Read. Hillside, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  30. Rainie, L., & Perrin, A. (2015). Slightly Fewer Americans Are Reading Print Books, New Survey Finds. Available at http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/10/19/slightly-fewer-americans-are-reading-print-books-new-survey-finds/. Accessed April 13, 2016.
  31. Rotman, D., & Preece, J. (2010). The ‘We Tube’ in YouTube—Creating an Online Community Through Video Sharing. The International Journal of Web Based Communities, 6(3), 317–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Schoonmaker, R. G. (2014). A Blended Learning Approach to Reading Circles for English Language Learners. Second Language Studies, 33(1), 1–22.Google Scholar
  33. Sedo, D. R. (2011). An Introduction to Reading Communities: Processes and Formations. In D. R. Sedo (Ed.), Reading Communities from Salons to Cyberspace. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Toft, Z. 7 Tips for Successful Book Blogging. Available at http://www.quartoknows.com/blog/quartokids/2016/02/23/guest-blog-zoetoft/. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  35. Twitter. Available at www.twitter.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.
  36. Van Dijk, Y. (2014). Amateurs Online: Creativity in a Community. Poetics, 43, 86–101. Available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304422X1400014X. Accessed February 16, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Welsh, B. Book Club for English Language Learners [Facebook]. Available at https://www.facebook.com/groups/452717861459307/. Accessed April 15, 2016.
  39. Williams, D. (2014). Introduction: Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare. Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. Available at http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/1366/show. Accessed April 16, 2016.
  40. YouTube. Available at www.youtube.com. Accessed April 16, 2017.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeneen Naji
    • 1
  • Ganakumaran Subramaniam
    • 2
  • Goodith White
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Media StudiesNational University of Ireland, MaynoothMaynoothIreland
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of Nottingham Malaysia CampusSemenyihMalaysia
  3. 3.School of EducationUniversity of Nottingham Malaysia CampusSemenyihMalaysia

Personalised recommendations