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Step 1 of EBP: Assessment in Clinical Social Work and Identifying Practice Information Needs

  • James W. Drisko
  • Melissa D. Grady
Chapter
Part of the Essential Clinical Social Work Series book series (ECSWS)

Abstract

This chapter examines models of assessment as the foundation of doing EBP in clinical practice. It details Step 1 of the EBP process: identifying practice information needs related to the client’s strengths, situation, and needs. Several assessment models are introduced and examined critically: the social work person-in-environment (PIE) model, the risk and resiliency model, the family systems model, the psychodynamic model, and the medical model. These models help identify a client’s strengths, situation, and needs to begin the EBP process. Many resources for assessment and diagnosis are discussed. A detailed case example of assessment related to Step 1 of the EBP is provided.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Drisko
    • 1
  • Melissa D. Grady
    • 2
  1. 1.School for Social WorkSmith CollegeNorthamptonUSA
  2. 2.School of Social ServiceCatholic University of AmericaWashington, DCUSA

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