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The Steps of Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Practice: An Overview

  • James W. Drisko
  • Melissa D. Grady
Chapter
Part of the Essential Clinical Social Work Series book series (ECSWS)

Abstract

The EBP practice decision-making process is implemented in six steps. This chapter outlines each of these six steps and their purposes. Following a thorough assessment, Step 1 is to identify practice information needs based on the assessment, Step 2 is to efficiently locate relevant information, Step 3 is to evaluate its quality and relevance to the specific client, Step 4 is to actively and collaboratively discuss the best available research results with the client, Step 5 is to collaboratively finalize a treatment plan, and Step 6 is to implement the treatment. The PICOT model, another model to conceptualize the clinician’s role in EBP, is also explicated. The hierarchy of research evidenced, drawn from evidence-based medicine, is introduced. The different logic and methods of EBP and of practice evaluation are examined. Resources for locating practice research are introduced. A clinical case example of the EBP process is provided.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Drisko
    • 1
  • Melissa D. Grady
    • 2
  1. 1.School for Social WorkSmith CollegeNorthamptonUSA
  2. 2.School of Social ServiceCatholic University of AmericaWashington, DCUSA

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