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Jennifer: A Young Homeless Woman Who Has Borderline Personality Disorder

  • James W. Drisko
  • Melissa D. Grady
Chapter
Part of the Essential Clinical Social Work Series book series (ECSWS)

Abstract

This chapter illustrates how the EBP practice decision-making process is undertaken in work with Jennifer, a 23-year-old homeless white woman who has a history of loss and trauma and who fits criteria for a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Issues of aggression and concerns about abandonment and loss are notable. Issues of assessment are addressed and the six steps of the EBP process are each explored in detail. How EBP is done in practice is examined fully as it applies to the specifics of Jennifer’s needs and strengths.

Keywords

Evidence-based practice The steps of evidence-based practice Doing EBP in clinical social work practice Case example of doing the EBP process with a homeless woman who has borderline personality disorder 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • James W. Drisko
    • 1
  • Melissa D. Grady
    • 2
  1. 1.School for Social WorkSmith CollegeNorthamptonUSA
  2. 2.School of Social ServiceCatholic University of AmericaWashington, DCUSA

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