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Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness of DER Projects

  • Rüdiger LohseEmail author
  • Alexander Zhivov
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

From the perspective of ESCOs and financiers, not much information is available on the decision-making criteria in the public real estate sector. From the perspective of ESCOs and financiers, not much information is available on the decision-making criteria in the public real estate sector. This chapter describes the basic definitions and structures of cost calculation and cost effectiveness calculation in the public real estate sector. These calculations are necessary for the better understanding of DER business models and financial models needed.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Linkenheim-HochstettenGermany
  2. 2.ChampaignUSA

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