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Lifelong Learning and the SDGs

  • Florida A. KaraniEmail author
  • Julia Preece
Chapter
Part of the Sustainable Development Goals Series book series (SDGS)

Abstract

In this chapter, it is posited that lifelong learning is a pivotal, people-centred educational strategy that should be tapped for meeting several targets for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Lifelong learning should, therefore, be given more space in the SDGs. The chapter outlines some of the tensions that surround the concept, goals, and purpose of lifelong learning. It offers an explanation of the arguments that ultimately led to the recognition of the need to include lifelong learning in the SDGs, but argues that lifelong learning is still inadequately reflected within and across the 17 goals. The rest of the chapter introduces the three main modes of lifelong learning: formal, non-formal, and informal. It is argued that these latter two modes are the least recognised in the SDGs, particularly in relation to poverty, health, and the environment, even though they are the most likely to contribute to the needs of the underserved and underprovided social groups. This chapter, therefore, focuses on these two modes with a view to exploring how they could be operationalised to contribute to the achievement of all the SDGs in the African context.

Keywords

Lifelong learning Non-formal learning Informal learning Quality education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of NairobiNairobiKenya
  2. 2.University of KwaZulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa

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