Advertisement

Postmemory

  • Stephen FroshEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Reflecting on ‘second generation’ experience, the ‘second generation’ here being the children of Holocaust survivors, Eva Hoffman leads us straight into the question of what it means to inherit suffering, and indeed what it means to ‘inherit’ another’s experience at all.

References

  1. Agamben, G. (2002). Remnants of Auschwitz. New York: Zone Books.Google Scholar
  2. Baraitser, L. (2017). Enduring Time. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  3. Baum, D. (2017). The Jewish Joke. London: Profile Books.Google Scholar
  4. Benjamin, J. (2016). Non-violence as Respect for All Suffering: Thoughts Inspired by Eyad El Sarraj. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 21(1), 5–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Benjamin, J. (2018). Beyond Doer and Done to: Recognition Theory, Intersubjectivity and the Third. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Butler, J. (2012). Parting Ways. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Chasseguet-Smirgel, J. (1987). ‘Time’s White Hair We Ruffle’: Reflections on the Hamburg Congress. International Review of Psycho-Analysis, 14, 433–444.Google Scholar
  8. Craps, S. (2012). Postcolonial Witnessing: Trauma Out of Bounds. London: Palgrave.Google Scholar
  9. Freud, S. (1909). Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy. In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume X (1909): Two Case Histories (‘Little Hans’ and the ‘Rat Man’) (pp. 1–150). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  10. Freud, S. (1913). Totem and Taboo: Some Points of Agreement Between the Mental Lives of Savages and Neurotics (1913 [1912–13]). In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XIII (1913–1914): Totem and Taboo and Other Works (pp. vii–162). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  11. Freud, S. (1914). Remembering, Repeating and Working-Through (Further Recommendations on the Technique of Psycho-Analysis II). In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XII (1911–1913): The Case of Schreber, Papers on Technique and Other Works (pp. 145–156). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  12. Freud, S. (1920). Beyond the Pleasure Principle. In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XVIII (1920–1922): Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Group Psychology and Other Works (pp. 1–64). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  13. Freud, S. (1939). Moses and Monotheism. In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XXIII (1937–1939): Moses and Monotheism, an Outline of Psycho-Analysis and Other Works (pp. 1–138). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  14. Frosh, S. (2013). Hauntings: Psychoanalysis and Ghostly Transmissions. London: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gordon, A. (1997). Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  16. Hall, C., Draper, N., McClelland, K., & Donington, K. (2016). Legacies of British Slave-Ownership. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Hirsch, M. (2012). The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Hoffman, E. (2005). After Such Knowledge. London: Vintage.Google Scholar
  19. LaCapra, D. (1998). History and Memory After Auschwitz. Ithaca: Cornell.Google Scholar
  20. LaCapra, D. (2001). Writing History, Writing Trauma. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.Google Scholar
  21. Laplanche, J. (1999). Essays on Otherness. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. Laplanche, J., & Pontalis, J. (1973). The Language of Psycho-Analysis. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  23. Levi, P. (1988). The Drowned and the Saved. London: Abacus.Google Scholar
  24. Luckhurst, R. (2008). The Trauma Question. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  25. Yerushalmi, Y. (1989). Zachor: Jewish History and Jewish Memory. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial Studies BirkbeckUniversity of LondonLondonUK

Personalised recommendations