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Open Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

  • Daniel J. Cuttica
  • Christopher W. Reb
Chapter

Abstract

Osteochondral lesions of the talus are a frequently encountered treatment challenge for the foot and ankle surgeon. Treatment options for these lesions can vary. Nonoperative treatment has a low success rate, while operative intervention has better outcomes. Multiple operative treatment modalities exist. These include excision with debridement and drilling or microfracture, as well as osteochondral grafting, using autograft or allograft. Knowledge of the proper exposures and treatment modalities is essential for the foot and ankle surgeon.

Keywords

Osteochondral lesion Osteochondritis dissecans Cartilage Talus Open treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Cuttica
    • 1
  • Christopher W. Reb
    • 2
  1. 1.Assistant Professor of Clinical Orthopaedic SurgeryGeorgetown University School of Medicine, The Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Center, a division of Centers for Advanced OrthopaedicsFalls ChurchUSA
  2. 2.University of Florida, Department of Orthopedics, Division of Foot and Ankle SurgeryGainesvillesUSA

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